Writers Write

The Quote I received at the First-Quarter Screenwriter Commencement

For weeks I was tormented by the infamous you-know-who — the Writer’s Block.

The story that I so passionately believed in wasn’t going anywhere. I dreaded writing every day I got up. I even doubted why the fuck I was still in the program. Shouldn’t I just go pack my bags and piss off already?

Then I reread the piece I published here after getting accepted last April. Miraculous, I felt grounded again.

Blinking into the empty blog space with which I originally had so many plans, I felt the urge to reopen shop — no matter how busy I claimed I was.

So this was the promise I made a few days back—

Write and publish something every day here.

For the past ten days, I am coming to realize what a great asset blogging is to get me into the writing zone. It’s like warm up before the real exercise. I feel less tense, and more connected to my words. The bitch in my head gets remarkably quieter after the warm up.

Over time I will get faster articulating my thoughts and feel more comfortable with my words. It all comes down to one thing — persistence. After all —

Writers write.

Here I include some quotes from the great Ray Bradbury to keep me going. A classmate (ye lucky bastard) got one of his quotes (the one on top) at our first-quarter screenwriter commencement. (*Mine is the one above from James Joyce.)

You must write every single day of your life… You must lurk in libraries and climb the stacks like ladders to sniff books like perfumes and wear books like hats upon your crazy heads… may you be in love every day for the next 20,000 days. And out of that love, remake a world.

Don’t think. Thinking is the enemy of creativity. It’s self-conscious, and anything self-conscious is lousy. You can’t try to do things. You simply must do things.

Love. Fall in love and stay in love. Write only what you love, and love what you write. The key word is love. You have to get up in the morning and write something you love, something to live for.

We should not look down on work nor look down on the forty-five out of fifty-two stories written in our first year as failures. To fail is to give up. But you are in the midst of a moving process. Nothing fails then. All goes on. Work is done. If good, you learn from it. If bad, you learn even more. Work done and behind you is a lesson to be studied. There is no failure unless one stops. Not to work is to cease, tighten up, become nervous and therefore destructive of the creative process.

Raymond Douglas Bradbury (August 22, 1920 — June 5, 2012), American author best known for his dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451 (1953)

 

Yours truly,
YZ

Author: Rock Bottom with YZ

YZ is a Shanghai-born LA-trained bilingual storyteller in various spheres.

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